Course Descriptions

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BEAUREGARD HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

LAUNGUAGE ARTS DEPARTMENT

  • English 9

Students in the ninth grade classes will encounter a comprehensive study of grammar and mechanics which emphasizes standard usage, agreement, sentence structure, capitalization, punctuation as well as a study of the writing process.  Students will study vocabulary, spelling, and word analysis.  A brief research paper is required in MLA format, as well as a speech and PowerPoint presentation based on the paper.  All types of reading are explored including but not limited to the short story, Shakespearean and modern drama, nonfiction, poetry, the epic, Greek mythology, and young adult literature.

  • Pre- AP English 9

The purpose of this class is to help prepare the student for college.  A comprehensive study of grammar and mechanics dealing with standard usage, correct agreement, parts of speech, sentence structure, capitalization, and punctuation will be required, as well as a study of the writing process.  The student will study vocabulary, spelling, and word analysis regularly.  One MLA-style term paper is required, as well as one presentation based on this paper.  One of the most important aspects of the class is the reading of novels and literature, both assigned and self-selected.  During the summer, each student enrolled in the class may be required to complete a novel reading assignment in addition to written work based on the novel before school begins.  Literature units covered during the term include the short story, Shakespearean and modern drama, classic novels, nonfiction, poetry, the epic, Greek mythology, and young adult literature. This course anticipates that the student will progress through the advanced track of English courses.

  • English 10

Students in English 10 will primarily encounter a comprehensive study of grammar and reading. This study will emphasize overall sentence structure, punctuation, and usage. Students will reflect their grammar skills through in-class writings such as essays, journals, and the research paper. Reading skills will be taught using a host of sources, such as short stories, plays, novels, poetry, essays, and contemporary non-fictional pieces taken from internet news and various other sources. The main focus in this class will be practical and applicable instruction in writing and reading skills.

  • Pre -AP English 10

Prerequisite: Pre-AP English 9 or teacher recommendation/approval

The purpose of this class is to help prepare the student for college. This course involves the study of the writing process with weekly writing assignments required. A comprehensive study of grammar, usage, and mechanics which deals with standard and substandard English, correct agreement, correct use of pronouns, verbs and modifiers, sentence structure and capitalization and punctuation. The student will study vocabulary, spelling, and word analysis on a regular basis. The student will be required to do an MLA-style term paper, as well as a presentation using audiovisual aids. Among the many requirements, one of the most important aspects of the class is the outside reading or the reading of novels and the study of literature, which will include the short story, Shakespearean and contemporary American drama, nonfiction, and poetry. During the summer each student must read two novels selected by the teacher and complete a written assignment for each book. Students will take a test on the reading on the first day of classes. This course anticipates that the student will progress through the advanced track of English courses.

  • English 11

This course consists of a thorough study of grammar, usage, mechanics, and sentence structure.  There will be assessments throughout, and at the end of each unit, students will be required to apply these rules in in-class essays.  Analysis of literature serves as the basis for content of each student essay.   The study and application of vocabulary is a primary component of this class.  Life communication skills are incorporated into the class study.  Finally, the ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop an appreciation for and understanding of twentieth- century American literature.

  • Advanced Placement English Language and Composition

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation/Approval

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.

  • English 12

This course places emphasis on applied proficiency of grammar, usage, mechanics, sentence structure, and sequencing of ideas in student essays. Analysis of literature serves as the basis for content of each in-class, timed essay.  In addition, the literature is the source for vocabulary exploration and study.  Life communication skills are incorporated into the class study.  Finally, the ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop an appreciation for and understanding of British literature. 

  • Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation/Approval

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. This course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

  • Mass Media

*This course does not fulfill one of the English credits required for graduation.

This course provides a survey of the growth and development of mass media in America from historical and analytical perspectives. The course summarizes the principles of the mass communication process and illustrates how that process affects the average consumer of the media. Students will be exposed to mass media problems of the past and present as well as trends that shape the 21st century. The course challenges students to think about the tremendous impact the media have on the political, economic, social, and cultural fabric of their lives. In addition, students, in their role as citizens of a democracy, will examine the relationship of media to government, the fine balance between freedom and controls, the role of media as watchdog, and the need to balance the First Amendment and other rights guaranteed under the Constitution. Students are expected to perform a variety of projects, including multimedia presentations, analysis of media-use patterns, and survey information.

 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

  • Algebra I

Algebra I is a requirement for graduation.

This course builds on foundational mathematics content learned by students in grades K-8 by expanding mathematics understanding to provide students with a strong mathematics education. Content is designed to engage students in a variety of mathematical experiences that include the use of reasoning and problem-solving skills, which may be applied to life situations beyond the classroom setting. This course serves as the cornerstone for all high school mathematics courses; therefore all subsequent mathematics courses require mastery of the Algebra I content standards.

  • Algebra IA and IB

The Algebra 1 A and B courses are rigorous and in-depth study of the real number system.  Emphasis is placed on deductive reasoning skills, as a foundation for more advanced mathematics courses.  Topics include but are not limited to algebraic properties and operations; algebraic and graphical solutions to first-degree equations and inequalities in one and two variables; relations and functions; direct and indirect variations; polynomials, factoring, rational and irrational expressions; and quadratic equations, inequalities, and functions.  Application will be integrated into all topics.  The use of calculators will be utilized where appropriate.

  • Geometry

Prerequisite: Algebra I

The Geometry course is a rigorous and in-depth study of the real number system along with geometric concepts.  Emphasis is on deductive reasoning skills, as a foundation for more advanced math classes.  Topics include but are not limited to geometric figures, parallel lines, triangles, polygons, congruence, similarity, coordinate geometry, area, volume, and circles.

  • Pre AP Geometry

Prerequisite: Pre AP Algebra I (8th grade)

Advanced study of geometric concepts contained in the Geometry course.

  • Algebraic Connections

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

The Algebraic Connection course is an intense study of mathematic in our day-to-day lives. It stresses the roles of mathematics in today's society and teaches students to communicate mathematically within their society by speaking, writing, and demonstrating mathematics as it applies to their own world. The course strives to develop the math skills that are necessary for successful careers. Topics include but are not limited to data collecting, graph analysis, analysis in banking, finance, investment, budgeting, probabilities, and statistical evaluations.

  • Algebra II

Prerequisite: Algebra I

The Algebra II without Trigonometry course is an extension of the study of the number system which began in Algebra I and Geometry.  Emphasis will be placed on the understanding and use of algebraic structure and techniques.  The topics to be covered in this course are algebraic equations and inequalities; functions and other relations; polynomials and rational expressions; exponential functions; complex numbers; and matrices.  Word problems are to be integrated into all areas in an effort to illustrate meaningful applications or algebra.  The use of non-graphing and/or graphing calculators will be utilized where appropriate. The computer software of Geometry Sketchpad will be utilized where appropriate.

  • Algebra II with Trigonometry

Prerequisite: Algebra I is the only prerequisite. In addition, Algebra II with Trig and Geometry are the only two math courses that can be taken at the same time for students who didn't take Algebra I in 8th grade, but wish to get on the honors Pre-AP track.

The Algebra 2 with Trigonometry course is an extension of the study of the number system which began in Algebra 1 and Geometry.  Emphasis will be placed on the understanding and use of algebraic structure and techniques.  The topic to be covered in this course are algebraic equations and inequalities; functions and other relations; polynomials and rational expressions; logic, statistics and probability; trigonometry; exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; and matrices.  Word problems are to be integrated into all areas in an effort to illustrate meaningful applications of algebra.  The use of non-graphing and/or graphing calculators will be utilized where appropriate.

  • Pre-Calculus

Prerequisite: Algebra II with Trigonometry

This course, Pre-Calculus, is to emphasize the study of exponential, inverse, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their applications.  The primary purpose of the course is to lay the foundations necessary for the study of calculus.  The content includes but limited to graphs of exponential functions and their inverses, trigonometric functions; conic sections: polar coordinate systems; and matrix algebra.

  • Calculus Advanced Placement

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

This course, A.P. Calculus, is to emphasize the study of limits, derivatives, and integrals; and their applications.  The primary purpose of the course is to lay the foundations necessary to pass the A.P. Calculus Test and to prepare students for the success in collage.  The content includes but limited to graphs of functions and their inverses; analysis of functions using limits, differentials, and integrals of the functions;   and to apply and solve real-world problems using calculus.

  • Analytical Math

There is no prerequisite, but it is recommended that students take Algebra II with Trig before this course.

Analytical math is a course designed for students who have successfully completed the Algebra II with Trigonometry course. It is considered to be parallel in rigor to Pre-Calculus. This course provides a structured introduction to important areas of emphasis in most postsecondary studies that pursue a concentration in mathematics. Linear algebra, logic, vectors, and matrices are topics that are given more in-depth coverage than in previous courses. Application-based problem solving is an integral part of this course. To assist students with numerical and graphical analysis, the use of advanced technological tolls is highly recommended.

  • Algebra with Finance

There is no prerequisite for this course, but it is recommended that students take either Algebra II or Algebra II with Trig before this course.

Algebra with Finance is a college and career preparatory course that integrates algebra, Pre-Calculus, probability and statistics, calculus, and geometry to solve financial problems that occur in everyday life. Math concepts and skills are applied through study of real-world problems in investing, credit, banking, auto insurance, mortgages, employment, income taxes, budgeting and planning for retirement are solved by applying the relevant mathematics that are taught at a higher level.

 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

  •   Biology (9th grade)

General Biology is a first year high school biology course.  Biology is a required course that provides "hands-on" opportunities through the use of unique learning techniques to introduce the student to the structure of matter, its changes and the energy involved in supporting life, the different forms of life, and the interconnections of the abiotic/biotic.   Biology is a course requiring enhanced learning and skill usage.  There is an integration of other disciplines into the biology subject matter in order to emphasize the interdependence of all subjects. The students will practice proper safety, research and laboratory shills while applying learned knowledge.  All students must study at home to internalize the concepts and gain problem solving skills. 

  •  Pre-AP Biology (9th grade)

 Prerequisites:  Parent request, teacher recommendation, "B" average in all subject areas

Pre-AP Biology is a first year high school biology course, which is a pre-requisite for Advanced Placement (AP) Biology.  At the end of the second year course, AP Biology, students will be prepared to take the College Board Advanced Placement Biology Exam.  While biology is required, Pre-AP Biology is a choice that requires full commitment to the course for the entire school year. 

Pre -AP Biology is an inquiry-based course focused on providing the students with advanced life science content about the patterns, processes, and interactions among living organisms. The emphasis is on increased sophistication and rigor of four core ideas rather than on memorizing a breadth of factual content. Students use prior and new knowledge to build conceptual understandings based on evidence from their own and others' investigations. They use their own learning and experiences to support claims and engage in argument from evidence. The standards provide a depth of conceptual understanding to adequately prepare them for college, career, and citizenship with an appropriate level of scientific literacy.  The students will practice proper safety, research and laboratory shills while applying learned knowledge.  All students must study at home to internalize the concepts and gain problem solving skills. 

  •  AP Biology (10-12)

  Prerequisites:  Successful completion of high school biology course, teacher recommendation

 AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes - energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.  This course is based on four Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about living organisms and biological systems.   The students will participate in science practices where they establish lines of evidence and use them to develop and refine testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena. Focusing on these disciplinary practices enables students to use the principles of scientific inquiry to learn at a more engaging and rigorous level.   

Twenty-five percent of instructional time is devoted to hands-on laboratory work with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations. Investigations require students to ask questions, make observations and predictions, design experiments, analyze data, and construct arguments in a collaborative setting, where they direct and monitor their progress.

  •   Human Anatomy and Physiology (10-12)

This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in a medical or associated health profession. This course is designed to relate the structure and function of the human body at the micro and macro levels. It incorporates basic science skills, terminology, cellular structure, cell function, tissues, organs, organ systems, and the interactions of these   systems. Students will engage in various hands-on activities in a laboratory setting applying the knowledge they have acquired while demonstrating lab safety. Students will also seek answers to questions of personal importance and interest and present to their classmates how it relates to life experiences.

  • Environmental Science (10-12)

Environmental Science is an introductory study of natural and man-made environments and environmental problems the world faces.  Students will examine how human actions have and are continuing to influence the world around them.  Students will be challenged to examine how their own daily habits impact the environment they live in.  Areas of emphasis will be ecology, the dynamic nature of the earth, populations, biodiversity, water quality, air quality, land quality, agriculture, and waste management.

  • Earth and Space (10-12)

This course is to introduce students to an advanced study of the Earth and to clarify the understanding of the structure of the Earth and the processes that have shaped it and continue to shape it. It is also designed to introduce students to the perspectives of the universe from Earth and the technology required for past and future space exploration. Students will make informed decisions using the scientific method, utilize appropriate technology and apply knowledge learned to questions and problems.

  • AP Physics (11-12)

Prerequisites: completion of Geometry, taking or completed Algebra II or equivalent course

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.

  • Honors Anatomy (Dual Enrollment) (11-12)

The Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology course is designed to address the structure and function of human body systems from the cellular level to the organism level.  The course addresses the interactions within and between systems that maintain homeostasis in an organism. It is designed for students who have an interest in learning how the human body works and for those interested in health-related science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. As students engage in the study of human body systems, they are encouraged to apply the knowledge and processes of science to personally relevant issues, including how personal choices, environmental factors, and genetic factors affect the human body. 

  • Physical Science(10-12)

Physical Science is a conceptual, inquiry-based course that provides students with an investigation of the basic concepts of chemistry and physics.  Students use evidence from their own investigations as well as the investigations of others to develop and refine knowledge of core ideas.

  • Advanced Placement Chemistry (11-12)

Prerequisites: Pre AP Chemistry

The Advanced Placement Chemistry course is designed to provide students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry.  AP Chemistry will strengthen the student's quantitative reasoning and problem-solving skills while developing lab skills equivalent to those of college freshman.  Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.  Within this, we are encouraging a knowledge-based positive attitude toward the sciences.

  • Pre AP Chemistry (10-12)

Prerequisites: Biology, Algebra II recommended

Honors Chemistry is an advanced level course of the study of all materials that make up the universe and the changes these materials undergo.  This course is designed for college bound students in order to study the basics in chemistry including the structure and properties of atoms and molecules, the quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, energy transformations, and the forces responsible for the existence of gases, liquids, and solids.  Chemistry is chiefly an experimental science; therefore, work in the laboratory is strongly emphasized.  Safety instruction is implemented into all laboratory activities.

  • Chemistry (10-12)

Prerequisite: Biology

Chemistry is the study of all materials that make up the universe and the changes these materials undergo.  This course is designed for students to study the basics in chemistry including the structure and properties of atoms and molecules, as well as, the quantitative relationships in chemical reactions.  Chemistry is an experimental science; therefore, work in the lab is emphasized.  Safety instruction is implemented into all laboratory activities.

       Science Electives

  • Chemistry of Food

*This course is an elective and does not fulfill the graduation requirement for a biology or a "physical science".

A one-credit course designed to provide an in-depth study of the application of science principles to the scientific investigation of the production, processing, preparation, evaluation, and utilization of food. A school-based laboratory is required for this course.

  • Forensic Science

*This course does not fulfill the graduation requirement for biology or a "physical science".

This course utilizes the scientific process and application skills. Study of how the following play roles in solving mysteries using forensic science:  crime scene investigation personnel; collection and preservation of evidence; firearms; trajectories; DNA testing; decomposition process; detection of drugs and poison; blood spatter patterns, forged documents.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

  • World History

This is a required course for graduation.

This course offers a chronological history of the world: the emergence of a global age; the Age of Revolutions; the Age of Isms; era of global war; the world from 1500 to present.

  • United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution (10th Grade)

This is a required course for graduation.

This course offers a chronological survey of major events and issues: colonization; American Revolution; development of political system and distinct culture; slavery; reform movements; sectionalism; Civil War; Reconstruction; Alabama's history and geographic  changes that have influenced aspects of life during and after events.

  • United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present (11th Grade)

This is a required course for graduation.

This course offers a chronological survey of major events and issues: industrialization, Progressivism; foreign policy; World War I; the Great Depression; World War II; post-war United States; contemporary United States; Alabama's history and geographic changes that have influenced aspects of life during and after events.

  • United States Government (One Semester Course)

This is a required course for graduation.

This course teaches students origins, functions, and branches of the U.S. government; representative democracy; federalism; political/civic life; analysis of Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other relevant documents; foreign policy.

  • Economics (One Semester Course)

This is a required course for graduation

The course teaches the basic elements of economics; comparative economic systems and economic theories; role of the consumer; business and labor issues; functions of government; structure of U.S. banking system; role of Federal Reserve Bank.